Posts tagged: streptococcus

Streptococcus “Strep” VS Staphylococcus “Staph”: How do they differ?

Streptococcus (above) Vs. Staphylococcus (bottom)

There are a lot of similarities between Streptococcus (Strep) and Staphylococcus (Staph) that lead to confusion. Both are:

  1. spherical, facultatively anaerobic gram-positive bacteria
  2. common members of the normal human microbiota
  3. capable of resisting many forms of important antibiotics
  4. some species are capable of being pathogenic, responsible for serious infections and even deaths directly or indirectly through virulence factors such as toxins

The key differentiating characteristics between these two groups of bacteria are Read more »

What is Streptococcus (Strep)?

Streptococci are a part of the normal commensal flora of the mouth, skin, intestine, and upper respiratory tract of humans.

Many people have asked us if ‘Strep’ is the same as ‘Staph’ or staphylococcus. Although Strep is another Gram-positive bacteria that is also responsible for a host of serious infections and is becoming increasingly resistant to many antibiotics, the answer is no, Strep and Staph are not the same and have different effects on our bodies. We think it is worthwhile, therefore, to spend a bit of time describing Strep. In another blog, we will summarize the key  differences between these two bacteria.

Streptococci are a part of the normal commensal flora of the mouth, skin, intestine, and upper respiratory tract of humans. As such, they are considered to be part of the “good bacteria” group. However, certain Streptococcus species can be pathogenic (or harmful) or can become pathogenic when the body’s defenses are compromised or when these bacteria penetrate the body’s natural defense mechanisms. Additionally, they produce a wide assortment of virulence factors and a large number of diseases. Read more »

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