Posts tagged: MRSA transmission

Rapid MRSA Diagnosis needs Rapid MRSA Decolonization Therapeutics

There are several companies which offer rapid diagnostic tests for a drug-resistant staph infection known as MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), one of the most common superbugs found in hospitals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that MRSA affects 90,000 Americans each year, killing about 18,000.

Rapid diagnosis of MRSA enables a healthcare facility to quickly determine if a new patient is colonized with MRSA and would enable intervention measures to be deployed more quickly. Rapid diagnosis is expected to therefore reduce  the spread of MRSA to other patients via healthcare workers who are seen to be the usual vector of transmission across the healthcare facilities. Deployment measures would include isolation chambers, full gown & glove protocols, hand washing before and after patient visits etc.  An additional use of MRSA diagnostics is the opportunity to apply intervention measures to  prevent surgical site infections since MRSA carriers run the risk of self-infection once their bodies are immuno-compromised after a surgery.

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Somebody else’s problem: Staff perceptions of MRSA

It has become increasingly clear that MRSA is a significant health challenge for the present and the future. Not only does it kill more people each year than AIDS in the US, but it is also a significant source of unnecessary patient pain and suffering. In Britain, the National Health Service has recorded a spike in contamination and infection rates, going from 2% in 1990, to 43% in 2002.

One of places currently undergoing major transitions in order to adapt to the growing problem of MRSA is the hospital environment. Here, the key element is the staff responsible for day-to-day operations concerning MRSA, namely, the health personnel. Previous studies done in this area have tended to ascribe the high incidence of MRSA infection in hospitals to a lack of staff knowledge on the subject. However, this theory has proved insufficient.

In a 2011 study, Elizabeth Morrow, Peter Griffiths, G. Gopal Rao, and Debbie Flaxman examined the relationship between infection control and the attitudes of hospital staff. More specifically, attitudes that tended to attribute the causes of MRSA to forces outside the hospital (such as senior care centers, communities, etc) or to incontrollable conditions within the hospital itself. Read more »

MRSA On The Rise Among Children

Hospitalized children colonized with MRSA have a very real risk for invasive infections, both while in the hospital and once they leave, so mitigating this risk is a serious priority – Dr. Aaron Milstone

The antibiotic resistant bacteria known as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is on the rise and children are at high risk for contracting skin infections that could develop into life threatening cases.  In a 2007 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it was shown that 95,000 people had developed serious MRSA infections and that nearly 19,000 died. The rate of hospitalization among children due to skin infections has more than doubled since 2000.  Hospitalized children who carry MRSA and yet show no signs of ill health are indeed still at risk for developing full-blown MRSA infections.

A study conducted between 2007 and 2010 at John Hopkins Children’s Centre found that children carrying MRSA were six times more likely to develop serious infections after they were discharged in comparison with their non-carrier counterparts, and eight times more likely to develop invasive MRSA infections while still in the hospital. The study also found that children that had been prescribed four courses of antibiotics prior to being treated were 18 times more likely to be diagnosed with MRSA than children that had not been prescribed antibiotics. These statistics suggest that the misuse and overuse of antibiotics are placing children at higher risk of developing serious MRSA infections. Read more »

MRSA In The News – Even Bedbugs have MRSA

The most recent news regarding MRSA is that it is now being found in bedbugs. Scientists in Vancouver are now looking at the relationship between there being so many outbreaks of severe bacterial infections and having a lot of bed bug infestations. Could they be connected? It is causing some concern for the urban areas in the U.S where there has been a rise in bedbugs.[1]

Doctors are examining the relationship between the number of infections and the number of bedbug outbreaks. After scientists examined five of the Canadian bedbugs, they have found that three of them are carrying around MRSA and the other two are carrying around vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) [2], another commonly encountered multidrug-resistant bacteria. 

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MRSA Transmission – How MRSA Spreads

Health care professionals are exposed to increasing numbers of patients with MRSA colonization or infection from both acute care and long-term care facilities. As MRSA is estimated to affect tens of thousands of people, costing the health care system $4-5 billion annually, awareness of MRSA and the sources of MRSA transmission has been steadily growing.

It is estimated that between 30-40% of the population are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. A growing percentage of these people are carriers of an antibiotic resistant strain, generally referred to as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) . MRSA is a type of Gram- Read more »

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