Posts tagged: mrsa death

Antibiotic Usage needs to be Studied for Long Term Harm

Apart from the creation of superbugs, overuse of antibiotics has negative consequences including killing many of our beneficial bacteria.  In the grand scheme of things, little is known about the bacteria we live with, and how they individually as a species, and collectively in combinations forming biofilms, get affected by various exposures to our antibiotics.  Insufficient research is being conducted to help us find the answers.

Some research has suggested that antibiotic use may play a role in conditions that lead to obesity, Type 1 Diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies and even asthma, a common chronic airway disorder. Patient populations suffering from all of these chronic diseases appear to be increasing in prevalence, but very little is being done to understand if anything in contributing to all of these conditions as a group instead of just individually.

In agriculture, antibiotics have been used as “growth promoters” enabling farmers to increase their livestock yield, as their animals can gain more weight with less food. The influence of these antibiotics on the livestock we eat is likely to have some impact on our own bodies but this field has not yet been adequately investigated primarily due to lack of financial motivation. In Europe, where usage of antibiotics in livestock as growth promoters has been banned, it was determined that the same dollars spent on extra food resulted in the same growth as yielded by the additional antibiotics.

Given that antibiotics are a critical part of our medicinal arsenal, it is not likely that antibiotics will be replaced any time soon. However, it is important to start asking the questions and dedicate more resources to learning more about how the antibiotics we use directly and indirectly are truly affecting us. Once we learn more about this impact, then we can start to make progress in influencing the development of new alternatives and better approaches to antibiotic usage.

When the future becomes the past: MRSA and microbial resistance

Let’s step into a time machine for a moment. Acquire some plutonium, unlock the Delorean, rev it up to 88 miles per hour and we’re good to go.  Destination: 1770.

The late 18th century was a pretty great place. Nations were being thought up and defended, women piled their hair into fantastic curly creations complete with white powder and men could sport walking sticks without looking like a try-hard hipster.

Sounds great right?

Unfortunately, it was also a time when the result of contracting a minor cold was often death.

Back to the future… (get it?).

This is the scenario (albeit somewhat exaggerated) that awaits us as a society if we do not tackle the problem of antibiotic resistance, according to the top health official in the UK.

Sallie Davies, chief medical officer for England, called for a global fight against microbial, or antibiotic, resistance, as well as a push to fill a drug “discovery void” to treat mutating superbug infections like MRSA, the National Post reported Wednesday.

According to the same report, new antibiotics are few and far between, and only a handful have been marketed in the past few decades. This means that when a new strain of resistant bacteria emerges, there is very little we can do to treat against it.

Read more »

How Much Is Your MRSA Death Worth?

Traditionally, disease has been presented as an army of creepily crawly microbes, lurking on every surface and wafting through the air, waiting to jump up onto our skin or sneak into our nostrils to infect us.

But in an eternally ironic twist of circumstances, the very thing that we use to fight off the bacterial invader might actually be our most fickle foe. According to the medical journel Lancet, antibiotic resistance is now “a global health concern.”

With friends like that, who needs enemies?

The increased exposure to all sorts of antibiotics in our everyday lives has made it so that bacteria that used to be wiped out by a dose of antibiotics have developed resistant strains.

One of the most common – and most serious – of these is Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the resistant strain of the staph bacteria most commonly found in health-care settings. Read more »

MRSAid™ Supports World MRSA Day – Get Active, Get Involved, Make A Difference!

The rapidly escalating human suffering and loss of life from MRSA in the United States and in other countries needs to be recognized and an immediate international response for prevention, awareness and education is imperative. – MRSA Survivors Network, Jeanine Thomas

World MRSA Day takes place this Saturday, October 1. The third annual world MRSA Day kickoff event and Global MRSA Summit will be held at Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, Illinois.

October has been coined World MRSA Awareness Month in hopes that the title would generate substantial awareness on the global crisis.  Challenging the status of global inaction and educating the public on the current MRSA situation are the main objectives for the special date, and the theme for the year of 2011 is “The MRSA Epidemic: A Call to Action.”  Jeanine Thomas, the founder and president of MRSA Survivor’s Network created World MRSA day in 2009 and stands as its official organizer.  Another goal of World MRSA Day is to raise awareness about MRSA on a global scale, while reaching out to MRSA survivors, communities, governments, and healthcare professionals for their ability to educate others and prevent the spread of this superbug.

It is necessary to draw attention to the rising prevalence and serious implications of MRSA.  A study released this year shows the rise of MRSA infections in the U.S. from 2.9 million to 4.2 million throughout the period of 2009 – 2015.  Over the same time period, skin infection treatment days are slated to rise from 20 million to 30 million, with an annual toll of $9.5 billion for the U.S.  The number of deaths resulting from MRSA have now become greater than the deaths caused by HIV / AIDS per year in the United States. Despite these startling facts, there has been little discussion or significant acknowledgement from American health officials on the MRSA problem. Read more »

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