Category: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

MRSA: Unstoppable?

Research suggests that MRSA infection rates have soared 17-fold since 1995

Research suggests that MRSA infection rates have soared 17-fold since 1995

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is a type of bacteria responsible for many difficult-to-treat infections. In fact, MRSA is a type of Staphylococcus aureas bacteria that has developed a resistance to many types of antibiotics, namely penicillin. MRSA infections are a major problem in hospital settings, as patients suffering from open wounds and weakened immune systems are more likely to get infected. These infections cost the U.S healthcare system 3.2 to 4.2 billion dollars every year[i] and kill more than 18 000 people. Read More

What is Streptococcus (Strep)?

Streptococci are a part of the normal commensal flora of the mouth, skin, intestine, and upper respiratory tract of humans.

Many people have asked us if ‘Strep’ is the same as ‘Staph’ or staphylococcus. Although Strep is another Gram-positive bacteria that is also responsible for a host of serious infections and is becoming increasingly resistant to many antibiotics, the answer is no, Strep and Staph are not the same and have different effects on our bodies. We think it is worthwhile, therefore, to spend a bit of time describing Strep. In another blog, we will summarize the key  differences between these two bacteria.

Streptococci are a part of the normal commensal flora of the mouth, skin, intestine, and upper respiratory tract of humans. As such, they are considered to be part of the “good bacteria” group. However, certain Streptococcus species can be pathogenic (or harmful) or can become pathogenic when the body’s defenses are compromised or when these bacteria penetrate the body’s natural defense mechanisms. Additionally, they produce a wide assortment of virulence factors and a large number of diseases. Read More

MRSA Transmission – How MRSA Spreads

Health care professionals are exposed to increasing numbers of patients with MRSA colonization or infection from both acute care and long-term care facilities. As MRSA is estimated to affect tens of thousands of people, costing the health care system $4-5 billion annually, awareness of MRSA and the sources of MRSA transmission has been steadily growing.

It is estimated that between 30-40% of the population are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. A growing percentage of these people are carriers of an antibiotic resistant strain, generally referred to as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) . MRSA is a type of Gram- Read More

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